Starter Bushing Tools


Capt. Mike

Moderator
I've long advocated the replacement of the little brass starter bushing in the bell housing any time the transmission is out. Usually costing less than a buck, it makes sense to change it while everything is out & clear.

The bushing is pressed into the bell housing and supports the starter armature. It is not lubricated, so both wear and drying out can have an effect on starter performance.

There are special tools. Schley Products (SP Tools) makes a nice set. The puller goes down into the bushing, then a collet expands to grip it. Tightening the puller bolt lifts the bushing right out.

Seating the new bushing uses a driver that is stepped; once to support the bushing square, and again to act as a stop so it's not distorted by driving too deep.

Schley Products Puller P/N 84350 is for 12 volt starters; the driver is P/N 84450. 6 volt starters use P/N 84300 & 84400 respectively.

For the 12 volt puller, you can make a reasonable substitution. Use a 7/16" bottoming tap (square end, not tapered), threading the bushing until the tap bottoms. Continue to turn to withdraw the bushing. The square bottom tap will not damage the blind hole and acts as a screw jack to lift the bushing out.

To drive in a replacement, use a 10mm x 50mm bolt with nut. Thread the nut to the depth of the bushing to act as a stop.

Thanks to Taylor Woolard of Knightdale NC, a VW Master Mechanic, for providing that tip.
 

CGOTTS

New member
Capt. Mike gave some really good information on this subject and I have had to change these bushing in a number of my VW vehicles. Not to add any light here - but I have been able to get away from doing these anymore - is to purchase self supportive starters. For instance, my '67 Baja Bug starter uses a bushing for the original starter, but I have replaced it with a '68 Bug automatic transmission starter. Most automatic transmission starters are self supportive, and so, no more changing out the bushing, just the starters when they quit. If I remember correctly, this goes for buses as well - so if you don't want to change out the bushings, try this tip as well. Good luck, and not trying to make light of your informative post. Take Care, CGOTTS

[This message has been edited by CGOTTS (edited 07-15-2000).]
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif I've been told SP has dropped the starter bushing pullers & setters from their current line. So the bottoming tap solution may be all that's left. I better start locking mine up, huh?
 

JWPATE

New member
Not to worry Capn' Mike. The tool company SIR makes the proper tool, currently about $25, for starter bushing removal on all the VW/Porsche 12 volt cars. It is SIR tool P239, available from many sources.
 

donnhines

New member
Bushing puller, etc.

THANK YOU, Capt. Mike, for this advice. I did not want to spring for a $35 special bushing puller that I would probably never use again. The 7/16 flat-end tap did the trick just exactly like you said it would.

One of my greatest difficulties was aligning the bolt holes when putting the new starter in. The two long main bolts that hold the starter in (in my '99 Jetta) are also part of the engine mounting/stabilization system. When I removed the final bottom bolt when taking the old starter off, the transmission dropped a half inch to an inch. So it was some patient (or maybe not-so-patient) alignment involving a jack under the transmission, and also a wedge (an ax head actually) back behind the transmission, because not only had it dropped, it had fallen back just a hair or two. So even though I could do the up-down alignment with a jack, I had to also find a way to push it forward just a bit. Pushing on a pry bar while trying to get the bolt to go in was just an exercise in futility, not to mention exhausting.

I've long advocated the replacement of the little brass starter bushing in the bell housing any time the transmission is out. Usually costing less than a buck, it makes sense to change it while everything is out & clear.

The bushing is pressed into the bell housing and supports the starter armature. It is not lubricated, so both wear and drying out can have an effect on starter performance.

There are special tools. Schley Products (SP Tools) makes a nice set. The puller goes down into the bushing, then a collet expands to grip it. Tightening the puller bolt lifts the bushing right out.

Seating the new bushing uses a driver that is stepped; once to support the bushing square, and again to act as a stop so it's not distorted by driving too deep.

Schley Products Puller P/N 84350 is for 12 volt starters; the driver is P/N 84450. 6 volt starters use P/N 84300 & 84400 respectively.

For the 12 volt puller, you can make a reasonable substitution. Use a 7/16" bottoming tap (square end, not tapered), threading the bushing until the tap bottoms. Continue to turn to withdraw the bushing. The square bottom tap will not damage the blind hole and acts as a screw jack to lift the bushing out.

To drive in a replacement, use a 10mm x 50mm bolt with nut. Thread the nut to the depth of the bushing to act as a stop.

Thanks to Taylor Woolard of Knightdale NC, a VW Master Mechanic, for providing that tip.
 

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