Accelerator & cable


George

New member
Hello! Wondering how to adjust this thing. Cable goes into a brass bolt. guide. but i need to put washers to take up the slack! This is a Dual Carb setup. I dont see any set screw to tighten up cable adjustment (Wont idle unless i use washers) Then it wont idle correctly unless I twist the connecting rod between carbs and try to get it to stay put! Either too low or High. Is the adjustment on that threaded rod on the Right hand side Carb? Like I mentioned I can use the washers ok, But it will idle low This is an Auto trans and when you shift to Drive Then it will Even Get Lower RPM, Almost to stall Please help if Poss! Thanks!
Geo!

[This message was edited by Capt. Mike on November 19, 2003 at 06:44 AM.]
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
Don't have a good answer for you and the Bentley is remiss in covering the throttle linkage.

The obsolete publication, Service Manual, Type 2, shows the FI system pretty well and except for the connection to your throttle rods instead of the air flow meter, should be the same. The first thing you might want to check is the connection at the accelerator pedal. Has the push rod or lever arm been bent? Is the cable end "hooked" just right? Or held correctly by the retaining screw?

At the carb end, isn't the end of the cable passing through a brass sleeve that has a set screw? Or is it a threaded end that uses nuts on either side for adjustment?

I'd take a stop by the dealer and check to be sure you have the correct cable. You might have gotten ahold of an aftermarket cable that's the wrong length.
 

George

New member
Hello Capt! well I worked on it again today. The Cable up front is on fine. The Brass part (bolt) Is just a guide seems like, Has no set screw. The Cable end isnt threaded either, Just has a Hole just short of the end. What I did today was to put a Clip on the end. This clip is the same as your bathroom sink stopper. Believe it or not! I reamed the hole bigger to fit over the Cable end used about 3 washers to take up the Slack. This gave me some "Spring" in the Tension as opposed to Just washers which were Very Stiff and just seemed never to give me Proper adjustment...Too High...too Low! And as of this Time it is Working! idles Great! Then when shifting into Drive it will stay at a Good Idle without tapping pedal. I realize this is a Fast fix But need to get it Tagged for road use! I will go to my Fix-it guy tomorrow and find out what really the Fix Will Be! Thanks For your kind reply!
Many Thanks!
Geo!
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
Transferred to consolidate same topics.

Sticky accelerator pedal

Vince Junior Member # 892 posted 10-15-2001 09:06 PM

Hi! My "new" to me 87 Westy GL has an accelerator that sticks just a bit when you first depress the pedal. There is not way to make a smooth easy start with this--it sort of lurches forward. Not in a dangerous way, but I would like to get a smooth, non-gas-wasting start. This is an automatic. Any suggestions?
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
Assuming you are sure it's in the throttle linkage, look at the diagram on Bentley page 20.8.

You can disconnect at a couple of places and manually operate the linkage to isolate the area of the malfunction. If not a cable itself, at the pedal end it could be a burred or worn push rod, pin or relay lever. At the transmission linkage, it could be wear or roughness in the ball joint, pin, push rod or shift lever. At the engine end it could be the at the throttle lever itself, not turning smoothly or having a hang-up in the pivot. Wear or looseness means there is slack to be taken up before the throttle responds which often leads to the jerkiness.

All of these are areas that require lubrication and cleaning on occassion, even if not part of the VW's published maintenance schedule. There are cable lubricants (usually called speedometer cable lube at many auto supply stores). 3M and L-M make sprayable greases (goes on like liquid -- dries to a grease) for the fittings, or even old fashioned WD-40 will work.
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
Transferrred to consolidate same topic.

vwstarfish Member posted November 19, 2003 12:33 AM

Broken gas pedal

While sitting inside my '80 westy this weekend in neutral w/e-brake up I notice he was idling awfully high (no tach, so not sure how high) It appeared that the gas pedal was sticking.Once I shifted it into reverse to back out of my parking spot, (manual 4 speed) with a thunk it then returned to (normal) idle, or what appears to be the normal idle...and has repeated this process for the past two days off and on...tonight while at the gas station, the gas pedal actually CAME APART right there on the floor.The pedal seperated from the floor, and in the dark I did get the pieces hooked back up enough to make the two minute ride home. It appears that the pivot pin has come unbolted and the whole rig was laying on the floor seperate from each other.I will be able to really look at it in the daylight.My Bentley manual was ordered last week and should arrive any day, but I would greatly appreciate you folks sharing any knowledge you have, has this happened to anyone else????.This is not my daily, but have been driving him once a day to stretch his legs.. PLEASE HELP.

1980 Vanagon Westfalia 4 Speed Manual tran.
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
When you get your Bentley, the accelerator assembly is shown section 20.6. The pivot pin is held on by a circlip so if it comes off, the whole thing begins to come unraveled.

Accelerator linkage gets a lot of abuse from dirt, spills, wet shoes and usually lack of maintenance and lubrication. The linkage also gets additional strains when the cable, boots and other parts between the pedal and FI are neglected so get stiff or corroded.

This may be indicative of general negligence and an incentive to look at your other linkages as well.
 

royadams

New member
I'm starting to have a problem when up-shifting my 4 speed 1984 1.9L Westie, but not often. Sometimes, the engine races to redline, as if you forgot to let off on the gas. Had my mechanic look over and lube the linkage, to no avail. Might happen every 100 shifts, or less.

Any thoughts for this intermittant problem?

Roy Adams-Atlanta
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
Just because he lubed the linkage doesn't mean he found the bind. And the binding may not be in the cable. The pedal has a pivot, relay lever and other attaching hardware, any one of which could cause an intermitent bind. Just dirt accumulation or a problem with the floormat can cause that symptom. There are boots (swell, melt), supports (loose, bent) and rotating clamp bolts (must turn freely as levers change angle) that could bind (Bentley 20.22). The tube could be dented or have debris in it. Finally, there is the mechanical linkage to the FI at the AFM.

WD-40 is great; it's not a cure-all.
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
Transferred to consolidate same topic.

bgsommerfeld Junior Member posted July 03, 2004 08:15 AM

I have recently acquired a '79 bus. The other day, I went to start the engine and the accelerator pedal broke off due to rust. I ordered the replacement parts, but when I went to replace them, the area around the bracket attached to the floor board was rusted. I'm uncertain as to whether it is held in by screws or rivots. I have the Bentley manual, but I can't find anything relating to replacing the accelerator pedal. Does anyone have any advice on how to install my new pedal?
 

Capt. Mike

Moderator
Your '79 is FI, so you'll find a supplement dealing with the Fuel system as a new supplement Section 10; Section 10-6.5 deals with the accelerator, though probably not answering your question.

Guideline #8 -- go to the dealer and ask to look at a new parts fiche/disk. If the pedal is attached with screws or nuts & bolts, it will show them. My ancient fiche shows no attachment parts thus I would suspect it was riveted or tack-welded.

Since you have to repair the floor anyway, you've got a clean piece of paper to work with; Vanagons use Phillips head screws into a threaded plate Or welded-on back-nut to the floor pan. If screw heads will be in the way, there are a number of flat head bolts -- often called blind or T-bolts that have almost no projection. (Basically a stud welded to a thin piece of plate as the head and then attached with a nut on the back side.) I'm not a fan of pop-rivets in that application but there are new and larger riveting that is not 'hot' like most of the OE applications. There are also threaded inserts (Nut-sert is one brand) that put a threaded insert into sheet metal like a floor pan.

Very rarely is rust in that area caused from the underside. It's usually due to leaks from the fresh air intake area or water that has come in around the brake & clutch pedals or other areas collecting and sitting in that indented area. Or just door & window leaks. Find and fix your leaks before doing the repairs.
 

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