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Thread: Fridge-water-battery (LED) panel

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    9

    Default Reverse Engineering the LED panel Part II

    Hmmm. Turns out that an 18V substitute opamp (like the TLC274) may not be high enough, without adding some capacitor filtering to the LED panel. Don't ask how I know.

    Best stick with the original (36V) LM324.

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    La Conner, WA
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Doc Brown,
    You mention a white wire you found in the analysis process. In getting my sink pump (1980 Westy) working again after adding an independent second battery, I learned that, contrary to my assumption that the white which is packaged with the thick red is not a ground. Hooking that to ground when I hooked the red to pos made the pump not work. Reading other posts, I started the engine, which allowed the sink pump to run. I read on, then disconnected the white from ground and the pump worked without the engine running. This baffles me, probably because I don't have a wiring diagram to tell me what the white is going to.
    Can anyone fill me in on this? If so, thanks!
    ...Tom in the Chocolatewagon

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I have a 1984 Vanagon, has anybody had the fridge Led always on? Even if the fridge is off the light is on.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1

    Default

    resurecting this thread

    i have an 83 AC with the green fridge LED. my battery LEDs were blinking wildly when switched on and the water level red LED would stay on all the time regardless of the actual water level. i had trouble diagnosing the issue. at first i thought it was was the potentiometer due to random output voltage drop, which i replaced, but that did not fix the issue. next i thought it was the op-amp chips, but before i ordered new ones i decided to clean the board/chips thoroughly to remove all the oxidation. all it took was some very fine sandpaper moistened with alcohol to remove the black oxidation from the op-amp pins (between the board and the op-amp chip itself) as well as slight scraping of the chip with am exacto blade between the pins to remove dirt/grime that may have caused the cross shorts. after that i used compressed air to clean the board (can stuff is good enough) and now it works good as new. try cleaning the chips/board first before you decide to solder or swap the panel. YMMV, but it worked great for me.

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