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Thread: Engine replacement -- considerations and procedures

  1. #1
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    Default Engine replacement -- considerations and procedures

    Hi,
    I'm in the process of buying a Westy and I'm looking at all the options from the most recent model to a late '60s 'fixer upper'. One '69 Westy needs a new engine and I'm curious as to what the range of prices is to get one completely installed and running? I know there are many different places to go, it's just that I'm wondering what the 'best case scenario and worst case scenario' as far as costs might be. If the worst case isn't too bad I might delve further into re-engineing. I'd appreciate your experienced advice rather than get hooked by some fast-buck salesman into making a mistake. Thank you very much.
    Sincerely,
    Joe

    [ 07-07-2001: Message edited by: Capt. Mike ]

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    Hi there. I am located in Mississauga ontario Canada and there is a shop that specializes in Vw. They have refurbishes engines installed complete for 1600.00.
    don't know if that helps but read my post above yours and look at the mess i am in [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    good luck!!

    Dean

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    Transferred from second post on same subject. Please do not post duplicats; add to existing threads. Thanks. Capt. Mike

    Dean

    Junior Member posted 07-26-2000 09:57 AM

    My 75 Westy has finally come down to an overhaul. I guess all that blue smoke and the oil consumption was a clue?? My question is that 3 of my cylinders were at 115 to 120 pounds with the compression test but my #3 was at 20 pounds. Now I know it could be a few things but should I replace all pistons and rings or just that one bad one? The burning oil probably means a valve job right?
    does anyone know the average cost of haning new pistons, rings and valves work done. Not used I would like to buy brand new!!
    Thanks
    Dean

    Capt. Mike

    Moderator posted 07-26-2000 09:37 PM

    See the post under TOOLS about leak-down testing; that will tell far more than a compression check.

    Regardless, a 30 psi means something has let go, probably with consequential damage. Whether a busted ring or valve, it will have side effects. Although your other 3 may meet minimum specs, a major part of an overhaul is labor. The additional cost of parts does not justify pulling the engine in just a little while to repeat the task on the remaining cylinders. Do all four! And also a head job while it's out.

    Quality OEM parts are available from reputable parts dealers, but do stay OEM & quality; there's also some junk out there. (Mahle makes VW's OE pistons & cylinders.)

    A very viable option is a factory reman engine. See the numerous posts on the subject elsewhere & in archives. More costly, but with VW factory warranty parts & labor any dealer.

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    Looks like I'm in the same boat as Joe-I discovered a burned valve recently in the #1 cylinder of my '82(air-cooled. The other three are in reasonable condition for 125K. Needless to say it seems prudent to rebuild at least the top end-that is from the rings/pistons up on both sides if one is actually that far into the engine. From what I can gather it's the top end that may be a bit weak in these engines-the lower end seems actually quite robust. I've had great results from Bus Depot for suspension parts so I expect to return there for rings and the necessary parts to rebuild the heads. As Mike noted the expense here is actually in labor unless one does it themselves. Speaking of Mike I'd like to thank him for his response to a posting I'd sent recently that didn't actually hit the boards. Hats off to Mike and the other moderators/mechanics that do a wonderful job of taking care those of us wallowing in Westy World.

    If you wouldn't mind Joe I'd be interested in the progress of your rebuild. Sources and sore spots if you will-I'll do the same as this progresses. I find that the experiences of other VW owners goes along way to reassuring me that I'm on the right track.....or not! By the way the $1600.00(cdn) Ontario rebuild sounds suspicious to me. I would expect to pay that for labour alone here in Calgary.

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    For anyone who's interested, I have the bill in front of me for a VW reman engine installed in my '78. The work was done by an independent import specialist in Winnipeg, in June 1998. Costs are in Canadian dollars.

    The engine cost $1927 (plus my old engine). There was a quite a list of miscellaneous parts, among them a new thermostat (compulsory for the engine warranty) and a rebuilt starter/solenoid.

    Labour to remove/replace the engine was $588, and again there were assorted other labour charges.

    Total parts cost, including the engine, was about $2500. Total labour cost was about $875
    for a pre-tax total of almost $3400.

    One reason I opted for an exchange unit instead of a shop rebuild was that I was unsure of the history of the old engine. VW will accept a complete engine as exchange, but if it's dismantled, there's a risk of losing the exchange value for things like a cracked case. I preferred not to risk it.

    2 years and 11,000 miles later - no problems.

    By the way jkc, have you visited Pick Your Part in Calgary? We lived there (in Calgary, not at Pick Your Part) for 3 1/2 years, and it was a cheap source of parts.

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    jkc: The question of a general rebuild vs. just the head(s) is always a tough call and often predicated on who is doing the labor and parts sources. And in your case, what is "reasonable condition."

    The one consideration I think too many overlook regarding remans is the labor aspect. A rebuild requires the same labor to remove & install, plus the entire labor of rebuild at what is usually an individual man-hour process. The reman has economies of scale, machinery (usually better) costs spread over thousands -- 100's of thousands -- of engines and highly automated specialty labor. When the private rebuild is cheaper, it's often because of dropping of many tasks (tests & inspections) or discount parts.

    '78's are delightful in a couple of respects -- still relatively easy to work on, yet have the hydraulic lifters, which is a major help in head & valve life.

    If your burned valve is the result of a bad seat/chipped valve or even a bad lifter, it could be OK to just repair/replace that head. Bentley Section 5-21.IV is the table of new & rebuild specs. Note new compression is 114-142 psi, rebuild at 100 psi. If all but the burnt valve cylinder are in the 125+ range & close together, I'd dig deeper. If others are below or marginal; then probably time for a rebuild.

    Have you done a leak-down test? See the discussion under TOOLS, "Compression tester over the hill . . ." A leak-down test will give you a much better assesment of remaining cylinder conditions than compression alone. 125K is probably the watershed of mileage. Since 175-200K is common enough, you'll have to GUESS at the remaining mileage. Is the rest of the engine super clean; had good maintenance all it's life; the other tests all encouraging? If the answer is no, then I'd go with the reman.

    Ludwig van: Thanks for the post. With all the misinformation and bad Internet posts, it's nice to see a documented confirmation. And a benchmark for all the other prices people throw around. I've got people that swear to me VW no longer does remans, the Canada plant closed, and my favorite, "I can't find . . ." when it's sitting on the dealer's shelf. Wish more would post their results instead of disappearing as soon as they get an answer to a question.

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    Hi,

    Well, I looked at one Westy that was on it's second rebuild, under warranty from a company in southern California. The owner of the vehicle paid over $3,000 for a rebuilt engine and a 3-year warranty for an '82 Westy. The first rebuilt seized at 16k miles and after a short hassle the company replaced the engine. When I looked at the vehicle the new engine had 17k miles and I was just a little leery of buying the vehicle since the warranty was close to maxed out and was non-transferrable anyway. Since I don't need a new vehicle right away I am still taking my time testing the waters.

    Good luck,

    Joe

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    Transferred from other posts to consolidate similar topics.

    Major failure of newly purchased used Westy

    flesh2dust Junior Member # 128 posted 06-26-2000 03:52 PM

    Hello perveyors of bus wisdom, I've got major problems. I bought my first VW last week (with a supposedly rebuilt engine 5k< ) and now feel that I sold my soul instead. Six miles from the previous owner's house, driving at 35mph, a rapping sound emenated from the engine, and 5-7 miles later a noticeable lack of power [drop of 10-15mph). After stopping to let the engine cool for an hour, the same pattern returned after 5-10miles. I repeated this twice and a gave up calling for a tow [100miles). Ironically, the tow truck driver seemingly fell unconscious for a moment and smashed into the back end crinkling the entire rear! I took the accordioned bus to 3 mechanics, and all three agreed that the noise was a loose rod and with a severe loss of compression on the entire right side [30-40), the engine needs rebuilt...again. Only two mechanics in my area [pittsburgh) are willing to do it and they want the princely sum of $2k. Naturally however, they all have indicated that a rod doesn't just come "loose" and there's no way the previous owner didn't "know."
    Sound logical?

    I have contacted several vendors to ship me a "rebuilt" engine, and after some research feel relatively comfortable with a place called Universal Machine and Repair--it's a father/son operation and rebuild each engine personally (which I feel more comfortable with than GEX type). They want $599+core (if mine is still good) for the rebuilt longblock with new heads w/ a 30-day, 3000mile warranty.

    I need the bus for about 25k over the next 2 years or so, and right now after all this I am financially strapped. I realize that a reman through VW is the way to go if you have the funds, and that any "rebuild" depends upon the mechanic, but is this a shot worth taking? If so, what questions should I have for the vendor (e.g what parts of the engine rebuild will be new, etc.)

    Any help deeply appreciated, Brian.

    Capt. Mike Moderator Member # 11 posted 06-26-2000 07:22 PM

    Please read the message board guidelines linked at the bottom of this page, especially #2-4.

    You didn't tell us what year & model and there are long discussions on rebuild vs. factory reman posted in the site archives.

    I suggest you park the bus and take a couple weeks sabbatical, thoroughly studying your shop manual (You do have it, right?) and this site to help you decide what is wrong and what your options are. Print out the various threads that interest you to supplement your Bentley. Then you can make an informed decision.

    None of us will recommend a rebuilder we don't have personal experience with, if at all. VW factory remans have a 12/12 warranty PARTS & LABOR ANY VW dealership; compare that with your local rebuilds.

    I feel bad that you bought a VW with severe problems, but there were a number of inspections & tests that would have picked those problems up before you bought it.

    flesh2dust Junior Member # 128 posted 06-26-2000 11:27 PM

    Thanks Mike for the info. Actually, I did read through many of the archives previously; however, my question wasn't directed toward whether to go with a reman vs rebuild, as obviously reman is the way to go IF you have the dough. As I said, I don't. Also, I really wasn't asking for an endorsement of the rebuilder, but rather whether the "deal" was reasonable under my circumstances from an indiv far more educated in this area than I. As far as I'm concerned, everything with these vehicles is a risk, just a matter of degree. I obviously possess a limited working knowledge but I need the bus running by July 15 for a writing assign or I'm in much deeper than presently.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>VW factory remans have a 12/12 warranty PARTS & LABOR ANY VW dealership; compare that with your local rebuilds.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Unfortunately, as I indicated the two shops locally want $2k.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> . . .there were a number of inspections & tests that would have picked those problems up before you bought it.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Actually, I downloaded a 12 page mantra on inspecting the vehicle and I followed most of them. The problem Mike lay in applying the information. I accept the responsibility for my shortcomings mechanically, but still it doesn't remove the blatant deceit that was perpetrated and knowingly so by this indiv.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I suggest you park the bus and take a couple weeks sabbatical, thoroughly studying your shop manual (You do have it, right?)<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Well, the Bus doesn't start now so it is crinkled and parked without my help. I do have the manual.

    I apologize for failing to indicate the bus model and year, '71 campmobile, standard 1600cc, and thanks for the comments.

    Capt. Mike Moderator Member # 11 posted 06-27-2000 07:46 AM

    There are Federal Laws and most states have even more comprehensive state laws about implied warranty and right of refusal. I believe a 30 days right to void contract on major purposes is common. But you would have to consult your state's Atty. Gen'l consumer protection office &/or lawyer. Unfortunately, now that it's crunched, that would probably void any right to return. Even then, "right" doesn't guarantee collection.

    Again, sorry your first experience is a bummer. At that age, a lot will depend on your desire to keep it original. Since it was basically a Beetle upright engine in '71, you do have more options and sources that the later Type IV engines or the water-cooleds.

    flesh2dust Junior Member # 128 posted 06-27-2000 11:29 AM

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I believe a 30 days right to void contract on major purposes is common. But you would have to consult your state's Atty. Gen'l consumer protection office &/or lawyer.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    As a lawyer myself, indeed you are correct Mike, however, again, application is the keystone. I purchased the bus in another state and to pursue this would require numerous trips and expenditures (that most likely wouldn't be reimbursed in small claims) and I would suffer emotionally and spiritually...all merely to acquire a judgment. Then, as you indicate, collecting becomes another problem. This should serve as a not-so-subtle heads-up for those making purchases through the Internet!

    The body of the bus is in nice condition (no rust), the front undercarriage including axle has been replaced, and the interior is great. So, my uneducated take is just take a loss on the engine and fix her up and move on. We reap what we sow, and surely this indiv will meet himself down the road. The only other prob is the ignition which once the engine runs warm, it fails to start from the ignition. I suppose something it's in the wiring, and I read about a bypass wiring kit from Bosch!?

    Oh, is it a problem to upgrade the engine from a 1600cc to a 1641 or 1688? Will that taint the authenticity of the bus? I'm assuming I will get the corresponding 4hp from each step up, but do you know if that will be felt in the beginning gears or end--will my cruising speed be enhanced at all?

    Thanks Mike, I appreciate the info and sympathy.

    erifah Junior Member posted 09-16-2000 04:40 PM

    I believe I got a screamin' deal on the 1982 Westy I recently bought. I think there is a god after all.

    Back in May, I put out word to people locally that I was in the market for a VW camper bus, preferably in good condition but maybe with a blown engine so the price would be reasonable. Well, some old codger who owed my dad $600.00 showed up at my house with a '76 camper bus: a really sad, beat-up, rusted-out hulk. But it got here under its own power, I'll give you that.

    Shortly thereafter, I went to see Jack at Bisbee Bug to see about unloading that hunkajunk. I mentioned that I was after something a LOT cleaner. He pointed to a yellow 1982 Westfalia that was parked in his repair lot, stated that the owner was contemplating having it fixed again, and added that it had been sitting there a while taking up valuable space.

    This poor '82 Westy is 18 years old, has only about 118,000 total miles on her, and maybe 5,000 miles on a newly rebuilt engine out of some outfit in California. The guy who owned it fried the original engine one day, so he had Jack replace it with. To keep from cooking the new engine, the guy fitted it with an oil cooler in the front, behind the grill, with long oil lines running front to back. For a while there, the Westy reportedly ran up to 10 degrees cooler in the hot Arizona sun.

    That is, "ran cooler" up until he popped an oil line & kept on driving.

    Naturally, after "completely destroying" the new engine, the guy was pretty depressed & disgusted. So I went to him and he sold it to me for $1,200. You might say that this is a screaming deal because I bought a low-milage Westy for a song. (No rust. The fridge and stove-top are completely operational & functioning perfectly. The paint polished up like new. The interior is amazing. It is 18 years old, but doesn't look a day over 5, I kid you not.)

    But I say I got a screaming deal because of what I found when I tore the engine down myself. (I haven't done this sort of thing since auto shop in high school back in 1982. Jack said to just follow along in the manual and take it out & take it apart, and call him whenever I got lost.)

    Well, once I got the heads off, I had to call Jack. The cylinders slid right off! The pistons moved about freely! This is a seized up engine? What the hecks wrong here? It turns out that the ONLY part that siezed up was the main bearing closest to the flywheel. Everything else was still looser & slicker than cat poop sliding across a linoeum floor. All it needed was a light machining of the crankshaft, new bearings, gaskets & seals, and rings, and I'm set.

    After all is done, I'll have spent only about $600 on parts & labor (I can tear the engine down, but I'm letting a pro rebuild it.. God bless Jack at Bisbee Bug...) And I think $1,800 is a ganga deal. And I also think there are more ganga deals out there!

    Oh, and that '76 camper bus? Some old hippie bought it. Pretty much paid for the parts an labor . . ..

    1987 Vanagon GL....New heads or New engine?

    BajaRich Junior Member # 10 posted 05-15-2000 03:19 PM

    I am the proud owner of a 1987 VW Vanagon Gl Wolfsburg edition. I have owned the van for about 1.5 years and have had little problems until now. Having 158k on the engine and a small yet pesky oil leak, I am having some questions to putting new heads on as opposed to putting in a new(rebuilt) engine. I have a major coolant leak out of one of the heads. So my question(s) is multifaceted in nature.

    1) Being quoted a price of approx. $2000.00 to replace the old heads with new heads, how many miles can I expect until more head work would be needed.

    2) Since the engine has 158k and the oil leak, it seems to me in a commonsensical manner(I'm no mechanic) that it is more cost effective to put in a replacement engine.

    a)approximately how many miles can be expected on the rebuilt engines?

    b)knowing that the rebuilt engines are of better quality now that they are being built out of Canada(no offense to Canadians), have any of the head and cooling system issues been rectified?

    c)Are there any other engine options available that offer more hp, performance, and gas mileage that are not cost prohibitive?

    Thank you for your reply as any and all help is greatly valued and appreciated. Decision time seems to be approaching rapidly

    Rich

    Capt. Mike Moderator Member # 11 posted 05-16-2000 07:47 AM

    If you've needed 2 head jobs in 1½ years, the first wasn't very good. A "head job" involves far more than the head -- it also involves checking studs, cylinder mating surfaces and other connections. I'd say your last one didn't find or correct other problems.

    That leads on to suggest, with your added oil leaks, etc., that you opt for a factory reman engine. You thus get a "new" engine with VW factory warranty. Note the many posts on the archives that factory reman is not a generic "rebuild." Rebuilds are only as good as the rebuilder and his parts. None will exceed the factory reman and darn few even come close. Factory remans include all of the upgrades to correct early watercooled problems so reliability should be akin to the late models or any other engine of similar design.

    They have discontinued remanufacturing waterboxers in S. Africa, but I haven't heard of any shut down of the Canadian plant. Obviously, as the vehicle ages out and demand declines, they will reduce the number of locations a particular engine is remanufactured. However you should be comfortable that VW factory remans will always meet VW specs, regardless of origin. Last price I had (couple years ago), a factory reman was in the US$2500 class. That $2200 head job would go a long way to paying for a new engine.

    As to engine swaps, I refer you to the my forum guidelines. I don't advise on modifications. There is a link to a sponsor on the home page that does engine swaps out of S. Africa. I cannot speak on their quality or effectiveness but the credentials (VW SA approval) exceed any others, most of which are home-made jury rigs and look it.

    MikeC Junior Member posted 08-24-2000 12:39 PM

    I have an 83 water-cooled westy, manual transmission, with 125,000 miles, and a canadian reman engine (40,000 miles on it).
    Recently, I asked for advice on dealing with oil in the coolant (previous post in coolant section). Your advice was very helpful.
    After changing the coolant, no more oil appeared in the coolant, and the the engine oil remained free of coolant. However, several small coolant leaks developed in the expansion tank seals. I replaced the seals on the expansion tank, and then noticed that the coling system had quite a bit of pressure in it even with a cold engine. Several days later, the tell-tale white smoke appeared on start-up....
    off to the mechanic.....

    It appears that the head gasket on the passenger side of the engine is blown. My mechanic is suggesting replacing the driver side head gasket in addition to the blown head gasket ($1800 vs $1100). In reading the replies to my post on coolants, it is possible that one of the cylinder heads may be cracked also.

    I do not know how severly overheated the engine was (I wasn't there), so I cannot guage the potential damage.
    The question is... staring down the cost of two head gaskets ($1800) possibly replacing a cylinder head, and not knowing how much heat damage is present, would simply replacing the engine at this point be advisable. I would hate to spend $1800 now, only to face another 1200-1500 in a few months. Especially for an engine that may have all sorts of damage from being overheated.

    Capt. Mike Moderator posted 08-30-2000 09:21 AM

    This is a classic case of pays your money and takes your chances. Who says gambling is illegal. The unknown is the extent of damage when they open the engine. It's a biggie as the costs can only go up. Especially if they miss something and it has to be redone down the road.

    Considering the $1800 quote (I would do the pair at that mileage) I'd have to think real hard about going to a factory reman engine. Then you would have a known quantity (i.e. same as new) with fresh VW warranty. An extra grand up front, but far less likely to have surprises. One of the chat room regulars (Chinook) recently did that and is delighted after a long trip through Canada with her fresh reman.

    jkc Junior Member posted 09-10-2000 09:59 PM

    I discovered a burned valve recently in the #1 cylinder of my '82(air-cooled. The other three are in reasonable condition for 125K. Needless to say it seems prudent to rebuild at least the top end-that is from the rings/pistons up on both sides if one is actually that far into the engine. From what I can gather it's the top end that may be a bit weak in these engines-the lower end seems actually quite robust. As Mike noted the expense here is actually in labor unless one does it themselves. Speaking of Mike I'd like to thank him for his response to a posting I'd sent recently that didn't actually hit the boards. Hats off to Mike and the other moderators/mechanics that do a wonderful job of taking care those of us wallowing in Westy World.

    Ludwig van Junior Member posted 09-10-2000 11:42 PM

    Labour to remove/replace the engine was CN$588, and there were assorted other labour charges.

    Total parts cost, including the engine, was about CN$2500. Total labour cost was about CN$875 for a pre-tax total of almost CN$3400.

    One reason I opted for an exchange unit instead of a shop rebuild was that I was unsure of the history of the old engine. VW will accept a complete engine as exchange, but if it's dismantled, there's a risk of losing the exchange value for things like a cracked case. I preferred not to risk it.

    2 years and 11,000 miles later - no problems.

    Capt. Mike Moderator posted 09-11-2000 07:31 AM

    jkc: The question of a general rebuild vs. just the head(s) is always a tough call and often predicated on who is doing the labor and parts sources. And in your case, what is "reasonable condition."

    The one consideration I think too many overlook regarding remans is the labor aspect. A rebuild requires the same labor to remove & install, plus the entire labor of rebuild at what is usually an individual man-hour process. The reman has economies of scale, machinery (usually better) costs spread over thousands -- 100's of thousands -- of engines and highly automated specialty labor. When the private rebuild is cheaper, it's often because of dropping of many tasks (tests & inspections) or discount parts.

    '78's are delightful in a couple of respects -- still relatively easy to work on, yet have the hydraulic lifters, which is a major help in head & valve life.

    If your burned valve is the result of a bad seat/chipped valve or even a bad lifter, it could be OK to just repair/replace that head. Bentley Section 5-21.IV is the table of new & rebuild specs. Note new compression is 114-142 psi, rebuild at 100 psi. If all but the burnt valve cylinder are in the 125+ range & close together, I'd dig deeper. If others are below or marginal; then probably time for a rebuild.

    Have you done a leak-down test? See the discussion under TOOLS, "Compression tester over the hill . . ." A leak-down test will give you a much better assesment of remaining cylinder conditions than compression alone. 125K is probably the watershed of mileage. Since 175-200K is common enough, you'll have to GUESS at the remaining mileage. Is the rest of the engine super clean; had good maintenance all it's life; the other tests all encouraging? If the answer is no, then I'd go with the reman.

    Ludwig van: Thanks for the post. With all the misinformation and bad Internet posts, it's nice to see a documented confirmation. And a benchmark for all the other prices people throw around. I've got people that swear to me VW no longer does remans, the Canada plant closed, and my favorite, "I can't find . . ." when it's sitting on the dealer's shelf. Wish more would post their results instead of disappearing as soon as they get an answer to a question.

    Engine R&R

    RegieBear Junior Member # 215 posted 02-02-2001 08:37 PM

    Greetings. Keep thinking that i read that type IV P&C's can be changed without pulling the engine. Is this true ? Thanks, Regis

    Capt. Mike Moderator Member # 11 posted 02-03-2001 09:01 AM

    Sorry, this is a bus site and you're not too likely to get Type IV information. And what's P&C?

    If you're talking about Type II's, which used a similar boxer style engine from '72-79, the engine must be removed for cylinder heads (Bentley Section 5-10.3), which negates any deeper work. And also raises the question of "why" since the couple of hours saved work of engine R&R time would be more than cancelled by accessibility, clearance and chance of error/damage.

    [ 07-07-2001: Message edited by: Capt. Mike ]

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    hello, i have a sick 78 westy w/ fuel injected 2000cc engine. I have 0 compression in my #3 cylinder and have determined i need a new head on that side. i will replace both but i am doing it myself using Muir and Bentley. Muir covers mostly 1600cc removal where the Bently is very black and white with no helpful hints. anyone have any experience with removing this engine? any must haves or helpful info? Thanks!
    marc g

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    The step-by-step of the Bentley 5-3 for the 1700-2000 cc engines is reasonably complete. I find removing the whole bumper as easy as just the gravel guard step 10, fig 3-7. I also prefer to remove the engine & transmission together. Any time an engine is out, one should seriously consider replacing tranny seals, clutch, etc. If so, you'll have to combine the 5-3 instructions with Bentley 6-4.1 but it can also be easier overall than fighting the starter & bell housing bolts.

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