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Thread: Fuel lines and clamps; between tank & carbs/FI only

  1. #11
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    Go to your dealer (Guideline #8) and ask to see the parts screen for your model. My old fiche only shows one "pipe", P/N251-201-215AA It appears to be the solid pipe that runs between up from the fram & tank lines into the engine compartment to join up with the FI system.

    It lists 3 replacement tubings: P/N N020 130 2, 8x1 (sizes in mm, ID x wall thickness); N018 009 1, 8x.7 which is also listed as 'protective' tubing; and N020 201 1, 7x3. All are 'meter-ware', sold in 5 meter coils to be cut to fit.

    Being a '91, you vehicle was not assembled by VW. '91's were made in '90 as KD kits and then assembled by Styer-Daimler-Puch in Austria (the VW plant was being converted to Eurovan production). Thus Steyr may have used some local purchase. If in doubt about the condition or safety of the plastic sections you've found, by all means replace and go back to VW original. The most common failur of plastic piping is crushing by the clamp or splitting.

    This site does NOT support "where can I get" (Guideline #5) and that portion of your post was edited out. Most aftermarket vendors buy the 5m coils and then resell by the foot or meter. Even VW dealers do that. Your dealer will also be able to tell you of any supercessions or upgrades plus current part numbers & availability. Go there first to at least find out which you require. If still in doubt, buy a foot if available (my dealer will sell by the foot -- in fact if your nice, might give you an inch sample off his coil) and compare to what you have on the vehicle now. You can then choose between buying a coil or by the meter.

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    89 Westy

    Here's a link to a site that has some fairly detailed photos illustrating the replacement of various fuel lines and specifically the lines to the fuel injector's. Admittedly, I was rather intimidated at the prospect of pulling the injectors, but this site gave me the confidence to give it a try. http://www.benplace.com/fuel_line.htm

    Here's also a second link that had some useful information:
    http://www.vanagonauts.com/index.phtml?catid=184

    Good luck,

    Troy

  4. #13
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    I was replacing the fuel lines on an antique Bug in conjunction with a major restoration of the drive train & engine. I removed the fuel tank to clean & reline. It most definately needed it. See "Fuel tank . . . topic. Other lines on this 38 year-old Bug had been replaced over time but I discovered the tank line to body line probably dated back to 1979 -- last I know of any major work that would remove the tank. Or maybe original?

    Anyway, it was so hardened that it 'clinked' when it dropped and had zero flexibility left. The ends had caulifloured such that I don't know how they held except maybe years of varnishing.

    I'm as guilty of any at looking at a fuel line and saying it's OK without actually removing it and doing a thorough inspection. That practice could lead to a fire some day.

  5. #14
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    I removed the tank an an antique VW Bug for thorough inspection and found it far worse than I imagined. Little pin holes had developed in the low point "sump" that wiping down, flexing and jarring turned into leakers. This Bug had sat for extended periods early in its life and I found it badly varnished with some rust. The copper finger-shaped screen that extended up into the tank was almost clogged and tearing at the bottom.

    The shop that I took it to for repairs and relining showed me some interesting techniques. Of couse the tank had to be throughly enptied and washed, but this will NOT necessarily make it gas free -- flammable or explosive gas can remain trapped in the rust and gunk inside. It was then steam & hot water cleaned.

    Next was a neat trick. The varnish tanks accumulate can keep the derusting solution from working. First, he put in a couple of courts of laquer thinner and a couple pounds of BBs. This he sloshed around in all direction for 15-30 minutes. Rewash; if it doesn't come clean, repeat with fresh thinner.

    Then he used a muratic acid and BB solution to descale the inside. This removed the heavier rust and left only a light rust that the sealer would take care of. It then requires thorough drying. You cannot dry the tank by just leaving it open because the evaporating moisture from the bottom will condense on the top. Instead, duct up a blower, or even the exhaust of the shop vac.

    This is the point where you may create leaks as you remove rust, varnish and debris that had been blocking pin-hole leaks. Mine took some silver-soldering at the sump.

    The tank was then lined. There are several products on the market. Browse the vendors in Hemmings Motor News or at Eastwood. This solution is put in the tank, sloshed around to cover all surfaces, and the excess poured back off. This must dry as above but a minimum of 24 hours -- give it more if you can. The liner should now seal in any residual rust and small irregularities or pin-hole leaks. However, if you did not do the varnish removal as above, you may find the liner will bubble or peel as the varnish is not stable enough to be considered a permanent attachment to the tank like the rust.

    I replaced the fittings, internal screen and all hoses. Don't forget a new gasket and screw sealing washers for the gauge sender plate.
    Last edited by Capt. Mike; 07-16-2008 at 06:27 AM. Reason: Typo

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